Bunyip Springs Farmstay
Bunyip Springs Farmstay    

BUNYIP SPRINGS NEWSLETTER

Most small guests are full of excitement when they arrive to experience a farm with real animal characters. Here’s a poem that I hope conveys the questions and response of a child’s experience at Bunyip Springs Farmstay.

The best of mates – Butterfly & Hector

“CAN I SEE THE BUNYIP FARMER KATHY?”

 I don’t think you’ll see the Bunyip that lurks in Bunyip Springs but come with me,  let’s show you lots of other things:
Meet the house cows, Cinda, Tilly and Floss
Of course there’s also Izzy, Belle and Fairyfloss!
Juliette, Sophie and Melrose also take turns at dairy duty,
The cow you’ll milk will be a gentle beauty.
Not forgetting our star, Ruby
With her big bright eyes that shine,
Her milk is rich and creamy, the taste is just divine.
This calf Tommy is quite friendly, really quite a dear,
So happy and contented, he’s what we call a little steer.
There’s Jenny-Jo and Little Moo, two jersey calves so pretty,
They’re future milking cows
For guests, who visit from the city.
Here come the horses, Connie, Morgan and Wandera to say G’Day
We’ll go down to meet them and give them a feed of hay.
Connie is the new horse. Hear her neigh,
With her freckled coat, she’s affectionately called,
The Flea Bitten Gray.
She’s such a gentle Arab horse,
It’s Connie or Morgan you’ll ride of course.
The alpacas love to find us
Curious woolly creatures who check out farmyard fuss.
They’re lots of fun to feed and lead,
We’ll show you how’s it done.
Just remember take it calm and easy,
Cause upset alpacas can get quite sneezy.

Now that I’ve been here for a week and a day.  Let ME tell you about the things that happened on my Bunyip Springs Farm holiday:
I dreamed of spying Bunyips while I squeezed the house cow teats,
At last the milk came frothing out,
While Mum and Dad cheered my farmyard feats.
It was fun to tell the cows I loved them and blow a kiss with a pout,
Farmer Reg says this makes cows happy then milk comes spurting out.
He also says they’re fickle things and we should dive for cover,
If a cow lifts her tail while we’re pulling on the udder.
We didn’t ask Bonny dog to our lunch time BBQ.
She came uninvited and bagged a snag or two.
I saw the ducks and chickens and helped collect the eggs,
And I really like the Silky hens with their fluffy feathered legs.
The alpacas were just quirky and I behaved my very best,
So they wouldn’t spit at me and think I was a pest.
I gave old dog Squirt a cuddle and played ball with Pip,
I just wish I could set my eyes on that elusive Springs Bunyip.
One morning very early, I thought I heard the Bunyip roaring,
But when I crept into my parent’s bed, it was my Father snoring,
And then I thought I saw it by the Springs muddy edge,
When I sneaked a second look, I discovered it was Farmer Reg.
I’m sure I saw the Bunyip’s shadow but he kept just out of sight,
So I nearly saw the Bunyip – nearly – just not quite.

The Bunyip Waterhole in flood

BONNY THE PUP How Bonny came to live at Bunyip Springs

We had sadly farewelled Bilby our blue dog some months back.  Everyone missed our lovable Bilby and it was time to think of a replacement.  I periodically scanned the net and hoped to find the ideal blue pup.  No luck.

Here I was one day enjoying my bargain hunting at Nanango Markets.  As always, I strolled through the livestock section first and there on the back of a ute tray was a litter of adorable blue dog puppies.  After the usual Oohing and AArrhing and petting, I identified my favourite and then walked away.  Over the next hour or so, “Take the puppy home”, kept humming in my mind, so I returned to the ute and this time walked away with a puppy in my arms.

The pups mother was tethered on the ute and she was a beautiful rangy border collie that looked familiar.  Obviously our Bonny  took after her blue dog dad.  The pups human family bid her farewell and I promised to put some photos on Facebook for them to follow.  Soon after posting, back sprung a comment and Bonny’s ancestry began to unravel.

Her human family had the surname Beddows, the same as my married daughter.  My daughter’s husband, Andrew was a cousin to Bonny’s Beddows family.  Andrew had given Bonny’s Mother, Duchess to his cousin.  Duchess’ Mum was Belle and dad Squirt, both working dogs on my son-in-law’s property.  No wonder Duchess looked familiar.  She had a physical similarity to Andrew’s working dogs.  In fact I’d already met Duchess as a puppy a few years ago.

Bonny had already strong connections to my family but there’s more!

A little while back, the old dog Squirt retired from the Beddow’s property and had come to live out his remaining days with Nanna, (me) at Bunyip Springs Farmstay.  Pip the dog I’ve had for 10+ years was a gift from my daughter and son-in-law.  She in fact was a ½ sister to Bonny’s Mum Duchess.

So here we are.  I bring a little unknow pup home from the markets and she gets to live happily with Grandad Squirt and Aunty Pip.

WHERE’S THE FARMER AT BUNYIP SPRINGS?

A lot of the time over the years, our child guests have only seen me, as an active old girl organising the farm activities and tending the animals.  A little girl whose visit was drawing to a close, one day lined me up and demanded, “So, where’s the farmer around here?”

“It’s ME!”,  I replied.  Her despairing look said it all.  My farmer “look” just didn’t cut the mustard.

Another time, I was doing the usual routine activities with guests, when my partner Reg ambled up to say “G’Day”.  One little girl was so excited, pointing at Reg and gasping something I couldn’t define.  “What’s she saying?” I asked the parents.  “There’s the Farmer!  THERE’S THE FARMER!”

Well that did take the wind out of my sails, but Reg did look the part.  Story book bib overalls over a drill work shirt which gave him a rotunded look and carrying that bright yellow stick in the shape of a crook.

THAT YELLOW STICK

When kids see that yellow stick, they all yearn to carry it and know what it’s used for.  We call it the Yellow Stick of Authority.  Of course it’s only used to guide or prod the animals.  However Reg likes to upbeat the story and tell children it’s used as a spanking stick if anyone is naughty.

“What’s a Spanking?”  pipes up one sweet little 4yr old girl.

Reg:                  “Don’t you know what a spanking is?”

Child:                “No.”

Reg:                   “A spankings when someone gets a tap on the bottom for being naughty.  Have you ever had a spanking?”

Child:                “No.”

Reg:                  “Have you ever been naughty?”

Child:               “No.”

Reg:                  “Are you sure you’ve never been naughty?”

Child:               “Well sometimes I do make poor decisions!” 

Gottcha Farmer Reg

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Bunyip Springs Farm Stay
503 Maidenwell-Bunya Mountain Road Maidenwell QLD 4615
Tel: +61 (0)7 4164 6175 | Email

 
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